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Early Learning Standards Essay

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Early Learning Standards The cognitive domain addresses a child’s ability to problem solve and express themselves. Children first develop cognitively by seeing and tasting things. Talking to them is also essential to their cognitive development. Later on, children add to their cognition when they begin to count and learn colors . Furthermore, young children often learn through cause and effect. For example, if a child throws a bouncy ball it will bounce.

Activities in this domain include pushing a ball down a hill to see what happens and observing things to see what characteristics they have. This domain encompasses the standard that all children are capable and competent. The language and communication development domain addresses a child’s ability to communicate their thoughts and feelings. Children first start to communicate by making gestures and babbling, but eventually they are able to express their thoughts in one to two word phrases.

Soon, children are able to carry lengthy conversations. Furthermore, children must also learn that it is important to listen when communicating with others. Later on, older children are often taught about communication when their parents and other adults talk to them and read to them. Activities in this domain include reading, writing, and singing. This domain encompasses the standard that children are members of cultural groups that share developmental patterns because children learn the linguistics that they are taught.

The social emotional domain addresses how a child feels about himself/herself and others. Creating relationships with others is crucial in this domain because they create a sense of pride in the children. Furthermore, children develop emotionally when they are praised for doing a good job because praise is the key to building a child’s self-esteem. Activities in this domain include playing with other children, coloring a picture on their own, and getting praised for learning a new skill such as going potty on the toilet.

This domain encompasses the standard that children learn through play and active exploration of their environment because children often learn who they are once they begin to play with others. The health and physical development domain addresses a child’s health and motor development. As children grow older, they learn how to stay healthy and why it’s important. A lot of a child’s physical development is learned through the senses. Motor developmentally a young infant may learn to grasp an object and within time he/she will acquire the proper technique to hold a marker in order to color.

Activities in this domain include coloring, going potty on the toilet, dressing/undressing, and teeth brushing. This domain encompasses the standard that parents are children’s primary and most important caregivers and educators along with the standard that expectations for children must be guided by knowledge of child growth and development. This domain encompasses both of these standards because caregivers need to be aware that a child learns a life skill when he/she has acquired the proper motor development necessary for the skill.

The approaches to learning domain acts merely as a guide to see if a child is ready for school. This domain includes the majority of the Early Learning Standards because the remaining standards don’t fit in one specific domain. Instead, the remaining standards help adults see if a child is showing developmentally appropriate expectations. Plus, these remaining standards give adults an awareness that there can be variations between the development of multiple children that are the same age.

The main activity in this domain is the school readiness test that makes sure that a child is developmentally ready to learn in a school system. This domain encompasses the remaining standards that include: a child’s early learning and development is multidimensional, children are individuals who develop at various rates, and children exhibit a range of skills and competencies with any domain of development. Furthermore, this domain shows how interconnected all the domains really are when it comes to the status of a child’s development.