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Journal article review: the impact of african slave trade on the african continent Essay

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            Introduction

            African slave trade has forever changed the image and social perceptions regarding the African continent. The black race has forever changed its role and position in the world’s structure of societal relations. Slavery and slave trade have led to the dramatic loss of labor in the African continent, with this loss subsequently reflected in the labor surplus in the major European states. In his article, Molefi Kete Asante argues that African slave trade not only changed the geographical and social picture of the African continent, but has actually become the source and the starting point for the development and spreading of racism.[1] Moreover, African slave trade has also become the source and the reason for the development and spreading of the distorted social theory of the white European supremacy. As a result, slave trade has changed the structure of the social hierarchy in the African continent, where Africans were positioned as the human elements able to withstand the “less food and no shelter” difficulties.

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            African slave trade has produced multiple effects on the quality of social interactions within the African continent. On the one hand, slave trade has forever changed the vision and the structure of the African social hierarchies; on the other hand, “without European slave traders, slave buyers, slave insurers, slave sailors, slave auctioneers, and slave owners, there would be no transport of Africans across the sea for enslavement”.[2] Slavery is frequently viewed as the source of social, technological, and economic advancement brought to the African continent by Europeans, but the reality is quite different, and the effects of slavery trade on the African continent are perfectly well described by Asante.[3] First, African slave trade has established the emergence and the flourishing of the doctrine of white supremacy in the African continent. Africans were not able to win in the long and continuous fight against white domination: “Africans have not survived equally well in all places, and currently, the doctrine of white supremacy is expressed everyday on the Internet and private circles”.[4] Second, African slave trade has become the source of the nagging controversy: with humanity having originated from the African continent, this very continent has brought the notion of social subordination and white dominance into the world’s social reality.

            Asante suggests that race has not always been a social construct, but that was African slave trade that changed the vision of race in the African continent.[5] Moreover, “the slave trade was preeminently neither a trade nor an activity initiated by the victims. It was not merely a mechanism to answer the labor needs of the Americas and the Caribbean, but an example of deep moral and ethical failing that relied upon the belief of white racial superiority to sustain it”.[6] African slave trade has forever changed the racial ideology. African slave trade has subordinated the black people, turning the African continent into the means for achieving the major economic, social, and military goals in Europe. As a result of enslavement, the Black people have forever ceased to be equal to those with the white color of skin; on the contrary, the Black people have turned into the instrument of collective violence, where European social domination was gradually becoming a widely acceptable social norm. Through the prism of the long-term social consequences, Africans are necessarily associated with the image of humans “who need less food than whites and are able to withstand the elements better than whites”.[7] Although slavery seems to have remained in the past, decades and centuries will pass before the African continent is able to minimize and eliminate the consequences of racism, which was and is the direct result of European slave trade between the 15th and the 18th centuries of the new era.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Asante, M.K. “The Ideology of Racial Hierarchy and the Construction of the European Slave

Trade.” Black Renaissance 3, no. 3 (2001): 133-39.

[1] M.K. Asante, “The Ideology of Racial Hierarchy and the Construction of the European Slave Trade”, Black Renaissance 3, no. 3 (2001): 133-39.
[2] M.K. Asante, “The Ideology of Racial Hierarchy and the Construction of the European Slave Trade”, Black Renaissance 3, no. 3 (2001): 133-39.
[3] M.K. Asante, “The Ideology of Racial Hierarchy and the Construction of the European Slave Trade”, Black Renaissance 3, no. 3 (2001): 133-39.
[4] M.K. Asante, “The Ideology of Racial Hierarchy and the Construction of the European Slave Trade”, Black Renaissance 3, no. 3 (2001): 133-39.
[5] M.K. Asante, “The Ideology of Racial Hierarchy and the Construction of the European Slave Trade”, Black Renaissance 3, no. 3 (2001): 133-39.
[6] M.K. Asante, “The Ideology of Racial Hierarchy and the Construction of the European Slave Trade”, Black Renaissance 3, no. 3 (2001): 133-39.
[7] M.K. Asante, “The Ideology of Racial Hierarchy and the Construction of the European Slave Trade”, Black Renaissance 3, no. 3 (2001): 133-39.