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Rogerian: Parenthetical Referencing and Position Essay

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English 112 / Guidelines for the Rogerian Paper

1. Select a topic from List of Topics under Course Documents and write a 2 ½ – three page, (maximum) Rogerian argument. Present your paper orally to the class from the projector screen for critiquing by your peers and final grading by the instructor. Study Chapter Six (pages 145 – 153) and refer to Chapters One through Eleven for many specific details and examples of the effective argumentation as needed. Include the Opposing Position, Common Ground Your position, the Support (data/statistics), the Consensus. When you present the opposing position, only include one. I want your paper to focus mostly on your supporting evidence of your position and how you can come to a consensus.

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2. You will need to utilize at least three articles. Information found from general websites is not acceptable. The articles you choose should not only help to develop your opinion/understanding of the topic you have chosen, but they will also help you present your perspective.

3. Follow these phases in your paper: (I will be checking these off in your paper!)

a. Introduce the issue and summarize the rhetorical situation. b. Explain the opponent’s position and show you understand it by restating it. c. Show in which contexts and under what conditions the opponent’s position is or may be valid. Then state the points on which your opponent and you agree. This is acknowledging common ground. d. State your own position, including the contexts in which it is valid. e. Present your reasons/examples for your view. Present your evidence/data/statistics for your view. At least one example and one proof/source/citation is needed for every point. f. Students will list specific points/areas of discussion in the thesis and will each point/area will be discussed in a separate paragraph with its own examples and proof. The point/area must be stated in the first line of the paragraph. g. Introduce the consensus in a thesis statement, which includes your three points as to why a consensus is needed. A consensus is a compromise that tells gives a solution that will work for both sides. Make sure there is
proof/sources/citations that will show the consensus is needed, different from previous information discussed. h. State how the opponent’s position would benefit if the opposition were to adopt elements of the writer’s position. State how your position would benefit if the you were to adopt elements of the opposition’s position. In other words, make a final attempt to show that the two positions complement each other and that each supplies what the other lacks. This is your summary, which, of course, will include a reiteration of your consensus/thesis and the three main points, as stated above, showing how the consensus strengthens your side and benefits the other side also.

4. Consider the goal of your paper to be a piece of analysis that allows your reader to come away with a deeper understanding of the issue based on your analysis of your key perspective of the issue using the critical strategies and examples from the chapters we have covered in class. Just remember that Chapter Six is the primary chapter to follow. Effectively support your position and consensus recommendations.

5. Do not just summarize the information you have found. Assume your reader/audience (the instructor) is already familiar with the information, and that nothing will be lost if you jump directly into discussing HOW the information proves the position.

6. When citing excerpts from a text and your articles, use parenthetical citations (MLA Style with 2009 updates), as you learned in English 111, as discussed in class and as demonstrated in your present course textbooks.

7. Be consistent with your point of view and tense. Eliminate contractions, run-ons and fragments. Refer to your list of Do’s and Don’ts in Course Documents.

8. Using what you learned in English 111, you should avoid major grammatical errors such as fragments, comma splices, and subject/verb agreement errors. Proofread your paper for these, as well as spelling errors. Avoid the most common errors students make (easy Writer, pages 1-10). Use your easy Writer
Handbook as a resource.

9. Your paper should be double-spaced, using Times New Roman, 12 point font ONLY. Your pages should be numbered and your name, class and due date, type of essay, and instructor’s name should appear in the upper left corner of the first page. There is no need to make a cover page; however, you will need to place your name and page number on each of the subsequent pages in the upper right-hand corner of the paper. Bring your complete rough draft to class on Peer editing/Rough Draft Day with a copy of the source material that you used for your paper. Submit your final paper by the due date and time in the Assignment Folder for that paper. Both online submission and a completed paper draft submission must occur on time to receive bonus points.

10. Include a Works Cited page (MLA Style). Do not submit the Works Cited Page as a separate document. Make sure it is included in the paper.

Please Note: A LATE PAPER WILL BE DOCKED ONE LETTER GRADE PER CALENDAR DAY IT IS LATE BEGINNING THE DATE IT IS DUE (This includes weekends and non-class days). THE ROUGH DRAFT, PEER-EDITING SHEET, AND SOURCE MATERIALS ARE TO BE SUBMITTED TO THE INSTRUCTOR ON THE PEER EDITING DATE.

ALSO, PAPERS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED IF THE COMPLETE ROUGH DRAFT HAS NOT BEEN SUBMITTED ONLINE.